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INTRODUCTION TO PAPERS OF GOPALPUR

[Papers of Gopalpur are those papers presented in the second joint meeting of the CCC and APRF in Gopalpur, Orisa, India 2009. Papers are dedicated to the theme of Interreligious dialogue and Vincentian Formation in Asia Pacific. All papers owned by the CCC-APRF meeting are already published in a book, Interreligious Dialogue and Formation (edited by Armada Riyanto CM), CCC & Widya Sasana Publication, Malang-Indonesia 2010.]  Read the rest of this page »

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INTERRELIGIOUS DIALOGUE: PARADIGMS OF THEOLOGICAL INTERPRETATION

Daniel Franklin Pilario, CM[*]

  1. Introduction: Stories From the Ground

Let me start with personal experience. Among the students that I teach in the Philippines are young people from Myanmar, Laos, Cambodia, Thailand, Vietnam, China and other Asian countries. In one of those classes, we talked about the resurrection. One student from Cambodia stood up and said he had experienced the resurrection himself. I asked how. He said his brother resurrected in him. I asked him how can that be possible. “My mother said so. While I was still five years old; I seem to speak and know what only my late brother could have said and known. So, my mother told me that I am my brother. My brother resurrects in me. Is this what you mean by resurrection?” he asked. Then another student from Laos stood up and said the same thing happened to his friend. And another, the same happened with her neighbour! I am not talking about Buddhists. I am talking about Christians living in Buddhist contexts. Read the rest of this page »

DIALOGUE WITH PEOPLES OF OTHER FAITHS

Subhash Anand[*]

The Synod of Asian Bishops felt that dialogue with peoples of other faiths was an essential aspect of Christian life in Asia. “The actual celebration of the Synod itself confirmed the importance of dialogue as a characteristic mode of the Church’s life in Asia.[1] The call to be a Christian is also a call to enter into dialogue with peoples of other faiths. “Ecumenical dialogue and interreligious dialogue constitute a veritable vocation of the Church.”[2] Read the rest of this page »

CHURCH DOCUMENTS ON INTERRELIGIOUS DIALOGUE.

George Varghese Tothamkara, CM[*]

I. Vatican II Documents

The Prayer of Pope John XXIII at the opening of the Vatican II was, “O Holy Spirit, Come down upon thy Church and renew it with a new Pentecostal experience.” This prayer seems to have taken effect. We could see the spirit of renewal and unity in the Church. The greatest proof of this is the document “Nostra Aetate” where Church’s attitude towards other religions is defined. However, this topic is also dealt in the council documents such as “Lumen Gentium”, “Gadium Et Spes”, and “Ad Gentes”. Read the rest of this page »

DIALOGUE WITH ISLAM

Armada Riyanto, CM[*]

Dialogue with Islam is one of the most challenging tasks of the Christians today. It is challenging for some reasons: theologically, Islam and Christianity have the same monotheistic roots as “Abrahamic religions”; but historically, Islam and Christianity do have many memoria passionis due to the so called “holy crusade” against each other for defending the holy land and for invasions in the past; philosophically, Islam and Christianity pursue the same wisdom related to God, but there seems to be unfinished tension among them; sociologically, people of both Islam and Christianity are altogether more than one third of the whole population of this planet; politically, the two of these religions are concerned with peace in the Middle East (Palestine and Jerusalem) and the growing fundamentalism which has always created terror and violence everywhere; and from human perspective of everyday life, all of us are to seek ways of dialogue to bridge and to collaborate with one another to make the better world Read the rest of this page »

DIALOGUE WITH HINDUS

Subhash Anand

The vast majority of the people of India claim to be Hindus. Hinduism has also significantly shaped our history. Hence it is imperative for Christians in India to understand Hinduism, to enter into dialogue with Hindus. This is not an easy task, because it is very difficult to describe Hinduism, much more so to define it. It includes people who are considered believers (āstika) and also non-believers (stika). Read the rest of this page »

ASATO MĀ SAD GAMAYA SOME EXPERIENCE OF INTERRELIGIOUS DIALOGUE

Subhash Anand[1]

In this article I am attempting sort of an autobiography with inter-religious dialogue as my focus.[1] It is not merely a record of what happened, but also an attempt to spell out the map that guided me in my journey, and the insights I gained as I tried to journey with other pilgrims. Read the rest of this page »